Using the AIM to measure matched line loss

A correspondent wrote seeking explanation of difficulty he was having measuring line loss using the advice given in the AIM manual using a scan with either O/C or S/C termination:

Note the one-way cable loss is numerically equal to one-half of the return loss. The return loss is the loss that the signal experiences in two passes, down and back along the open cable.

Because my correspondent was using one of the versions of AIM that I know to be unreliable, I have repeated the measurements on a cable at hand using AIM_900B to demonstrate the situation.

The test cable I have used is 10m of RG58C/U which I expect should have matched line loss (MLL) of 0.26dB, but I expect this to be a little worse as it is a budget grade cable that I have measured worse in the past. Continue reading Using the AIM to measure matched line loss

Baofeng GT-3TP MkIII review

This article is a review of the Baofeng GT-3TP MkIII, a hand held 2m/70cm FM transceiver.

The radio is supplied with a bunch of useful accessories (even if the power supply lacks the necessary Australian approval) and a brief and inadequate manual.

BaofengGT3TP

Above, the Baofeng GT-3TP purchased for about A$85 delivered overnight from Sydney. Continue reading Baofeng GT-3TP MkIII review

Antenna span tensioner using a counterweighted halyard

Correspondents have asked about application of the technique used in Antenna span spring tensioner using Antenna wire catenary calculator to a span tensioned with a counterweighted halyard.

The scenarios bear a lot of similarity, the main difference being that the tension from the counterweight is constant up to the point that the counterweight travel reaches its limit.

The tension applied is the weight force of the counterweight with a little increase to allow for friction in the sheave block.

So, lets say the scenario is a 42m wire plus halyard that adds 1m to the span under no wind conditions and can pay out a further 1m at which it reaches its limit. Lets say the counterweight is 5kg weight so 49.0N tension. Continue reading Antenna span tensioner using a counterweighted halyard

Antenna span spring tensioner

A correspondent asked about application of the Antenna wire catenary calculator to a scenario with a spring tensioner in a simple span.

His proposed tensioner has a maximum length of 2.6m at a tension of 445N, and the intention is to tension the span with no wind loading to 178N at which the tensioner is 1.92m long. Minimum GBS of the tensioner is 1560N, WLL=456N (ie the tensioner is specified that with safety factor 3.5, it reaches its working load limit at full extension).

The following is a simple analysis that assumes the fixed supports are equal height, the tensioner has the same m/l as the wire, and 2mm (#12) 30% Copperweld is used for the wire which is 42m long, so the distance between supports is taken to be 45m. Continue reading Antenna span spring tensioner

Capacitive loading device for fine tuning wire dipoles

There are applications where you might want to make the tuning of a wire dipole adjustable.

Adjusting the length is often not convenient, especially in-service tuning which might be triggered by changing vegetation, ground moisture etc.

This article shows some simple means of attachment of a small capacitive load to deploy near the high charge points, and to adjust their effect by moving them to or fro on the main dipole wire. Continue reading Capacitive loading device for fine tuning wire dipoles

Cooling an IC2200H – update #2

I have described a solution an overheating problem with my IC2200H at Cooling an IC2200H.

IC2000HCoolingAnother solution for control of the fan to minimise nuisance draft and noise is one of the inexpensive digital thermostats on eBay.

I reviewed one of these things at Review of inexpensive Chinese thermostat – MH-1210. It had its issues, but as modified for 12VDC operation, I tested it for control of the fan in the above pic.

cctstat01Above is the thermostat, though modified, purchased for about A$12 including post and the sensor thermistor. Don’t buy the MH-1210 as some at least are shipped with incorrect calibration. Continue reading Cooling an IC2200H – update #2

VK3IL’s 3m circumference LDF4-50B loop on 20m

David, VK3IL, describes a small transmitting loop (STL) at Portable magnetic loop antenna.

At VK3IL’s 3m circumference LDF4-50B loop on 40m. I reviewed his loop behaviour on 40m, and its efficiency was quite low… though typical of a loop of that size at that frequency.

Radiation resistance of a STL is proportional to the fourth power of frequency, and since it is often dwarfed by loss resistance, we should expect that doubling frequency will dramatically improve performance.

As far as I can glean from the article, it is made from a 3m length of LDF4-50B Heliax, and uses a Patterson match to tune it.

Clip 153David offered measurement of VSWR around centre frequency for the loop approximately matched (VSWR=1.24) on 20m. He has measured the VSWR=2.86 bandwidth shown between markers 2 and 3 to be 45kHz. Continue reading VK3IL’s 3m circumference LDF4-50B loop on 20m

Enhancement of Calculate small transmitting loop gain from bandwidth measurement

At Efficiency and gain of Small Transmitting Loops (STL) I explained an approach to assessing the gain the efficiency of STL, and provided a link to a calculator to perform the calcs.

This expands on application of the concepts and introduces an enhanced calculator to perform the calculations.

Clip 222

Firstly, this technique applies to antennas where the VSWR characteristic is consistent with a feed point or virtual feed point where around the frequency of minimum VSWR, X varies with frequency much more than R. The simplified analysis assumes that R is constant, and change in X is the reason for the VSWR characteristic. See VSWR curve of a simple series resonant antenna for more information. Continue reading Enhancement of Calculate small transmitting loop gain from bandwidth measurement

VK3IL’s 3m circumference LDF4-50B loop on 40m

David, VK3IL, describes a small transmitting loop (STL) at Portable magnetic loop antenna.

As far as I can glean from the article, it is made from a 3m length of LDF4-50B Heliax, and uses a Patterson match to tune it.

Clip 150David offered measurement of VSWR around centre frequency for the loop matched on 40m. He has measured the VSWR=2.6 (the half power) bandwidth shown between markers 2 and 3 to be 22kHz. Continue reading VK3IL’s 3m circumference LDF4-50B loop on 40m

Cooling an IC2200H – update

IC2000HCooling2

I have an IC2200H mounted on my operating table with 25mm clearance above the radio and ample room for convection currents to assist in heat removal. It is concerning that the case temperature reaches temperatures that are not safe to touch, temperatures in excess of 75° (55° above ambient) have been measured and that has not triggered the internal temperature protection… so it could get hotter still!

Whilst it might take a while for the radio to reach high temperatures, in the long term, it must dissipate around 139W when transmitting on HIGH power setting and at ambient temperatures as high as 35° in the shack. (Rated input is 15A at 13.6V for 65W out, leaving 139W of heat to be dissipated.)

This is one of those high power mobile radios that advertises no fan as an advantage, but it is clearly not up to the task!

The objective of this change is to keep the external parts below 60°, the (ASTM standard C1055  1999) 5 second human skin burn threshold.

Continue reading Cooling an IC2200H – update